NO CAPTION NEEDED
ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHS, PUBLIC CULTURE, AND LIBERAL DEMOCRACY

No Caption Needed is a book and a blog, each dedicated to discussion of the role that photojournalism and other visual practices play in a vital democratic society. No caption needed, but many are provided. . . .

November 14th, 2014

Catastrophic Reflections: Depression Era Greece and Beyond

Posted by Hariman in catastrophe, conferences & shows

Fysakis, Nea Helvetia

The Depression Era project inhabits the urban and social landscapes of the crisis. It begins as a collective experiment, picturing the Greek city and its outer regions, the private lives of outcasts, the collapse of public systems and snapshots of the everyday in order to understand the social, economical and historical transformation currently taking place in Greece. It seeks to do so with as clear a gaze as possible. It understands, in its double meaning, that entropy, disaster, uncertainty and insolvency are also states of mind, ushering us to an era where the notion of progress, the idea of growth and the reflex of looking forward to a future are no longer dominant modes of perceiving and creating in the world.

The Depression Era project brings together 30+ artists, photographers, writers, curators, designers and researchers. It seeks to stand outside the media montage and white noise of current public discourse by creating its own mosaic of images and texts. Its immediate goals are the broadcast and dynamic exploration of this mosaic on an online platform, a series of international exhibitions and publications. Its long-term goals include an open call to young artists, the eventual creation of an artistic archive of the crisis and through it, a new digital and physical Commons, an ‘anti-screen’ and ‘sidewalk museum’ that would return its mosaic of gazes back to their places of origin.

The Depression Era collective agrees that its images and texts are not Greek, but European, viewports to the shape of things to come, straddling the red line and offering an alternative, unofficial story to the Crisis.

Work is displayed at the link above, and exhibitions currently are on display via Central Dupon Images in Paris and the Benaki Museum in Athens.

Photograph by Pavlos Fysakis.

November 7th, 2014

All Out in the Streets at the University of Chicago

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

All Out in the Streets Final-01

October 31st, 2014

Symposium on Securing the Image

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Symposium on Visual Rhetoric

Securing the Image: Surveillance, Verification, and Global Violence

TSA panels

Northwestern University

Annie May Swift Hall

November 1, 2014

Somewhere between the worldwide adoption of digital imaging technologies and the Global War on Terror, photographic documentation became both highly suspect and increasingly important. Questions regarding surveillance, manipulation, and other factors in image production have become occasions for inquiry into some of the most basic assumptions about visual media and public culture. These questions acquire additional significance when visual practices are intertwined with violence done in the name of national security. At the same time, they offer new vantages for rethinking the nature of the image and its aesthetic and political possibilities. The symposium on Securing the Image includes two public lectures devoted to reconsidering key issues in visual surveillance and verification:

9:00 a.m.  David Campbell, “Manipulation, Scraping, and Verification: Securing the Integrity of Visual Representations of Political Violence”

10:30 a.m.  Rachel Hall, “Asymmetrical Transparency: The Global Politics of Risk Management”

David Campbell is the A. Lindsay O’Connor Professor in the Peace and Conflict Studies Program at Colgate University. He is the author of six books and more than 60 articles, and has produced visual projects on the Bosnian War, imaging famine, and the visual economy of HIV-AIDS. As a research consultant to World Press Photo he directed their 2012-13 Multimedia Research Project and a 2014 project on “The Integrity of the Image.” He is also Secretary to the World Press Photo Contest. David produces multimedia and video projects, and all his work can be seen at www.david-campbell.org.

Rachel Hall is Associate Professor of Communication Studies at Louisiana State University. Her publications included Wanted: The Outlaw in American Visual Culture (University of Virginia Press, 2009), The Transparent Traveler: The Performance and Culture of Airport Security (Duke University Press, 2015), and articles in Performance Research, Women’s Studies Quarterly, The Communication Review, Camera Obscura: Feminism, Culture and Media Studies, and Hypatia: Journal of Feminist Philosophy.

Sponsored by the Center for Global Culture and Communication and the Department of Communication Studies/Program in Rhetoric and Public Culture.  For additional information contact symposium organizer Robert Hariman (r-hariman2@northwestern.edu) or administrative assistant Dakota Brown (jdakotabrown@u.northwestern.edu).

 

October 24th, 2014

Paper Call: Photography and Migration

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

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Photography and Migration

Colby College, Waterville, ME

April 24-25, 2015

On April 24-25, 2015, scholars, artists, students, and members of the Waterville community will come together at Colby College to interrogate the relationship between photography and migration. This conference is one of many events taking place at Colby that address the college-wide humanities theme in 2014-2015, “Migrations,” hosted by the Center for the Arts and Humanities. It will include formal presentations and roundtable discussions, film screenings, as well as displays of historical photographs and artworks.

Throughout its history, the photographic medium has played an important role in the movement of people, objects, identities, and ideas across time and space, especially in the human crossing of geographical and cultural borders. Scholars have shown how cameras documented, enabled, or controlled such forced and voluntary movement, while photographers attempted to put a face on immigration around the world, making visible its associations with transition, displacement, hardship, and opportunity. The goal of the conference is to consolidate and expand upon the critical questions asked about photography and migration. What does it mean, for instance, to represent photographically the experiences of immigration, exile, diaspora, and passing? How might we reimagine concepts essential to migration, such as (im)mobility and dissemination, in specifically photographic terms? How do photographs themselves, moreover, migrate across local, regional, national, and global contexts?

To stimulate lively and productive exchanges during the conference, we are soliciting proposals for 10-minute presentations from scholars, curators, image-makers, and others that highlight major questions about photography and migration. Following each presentation will be a short response by a discussant from Colby College and 20 minutes of conversation with the audience. We are looking for proposals that address directly the theme of the conference; foreground their own critical and creative interventions; and engage deeply with a set of images, or even a single image.Please submit the following materials to Tanya Sheehan, Associate Professor, Department of Art, Colby College, tsheehan@colby.edu by December 15, 2014:

  • Cover letter; please include your contact information and explain your interest in the conference theme
  • Abstract; no more than 200 words, including a working title for your presentation
  • Professional bio; no more than 100 words
  • Curriculum vitae

Decisions on proposals will be made by January 15, 2015.

Details about the conference will be made available here.

October 17th, 2014

Paper Call: Conference on Media Materiality

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Sixth International Conference on the Image

imagecell

Media Materiality: Towards Critical Economies of “New” Media

Clark Kerr Conference Center
University of California at Berkeley
Berkeley, California USA
29-30 October 2015

The conference web site is here.  The call for papers is here.  The submission deadline is November 6, 2014.

July 25th, 2014

Artificial Light in Philly

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

How much can you catch in a flash of light?

portrait by Sarah Stolfa

A lot.

Artificial Light: Flash Photography in the Twentieth Century is an exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art through August 3.  The exhibition web page includes a slide show, along with a video interview with photographer Sara Stolfa, who took the photograph above.  You also can see a brief discussion of the show at Time Lightbox.  An intriguing review, one that connects flash artistry with the value of compassion, is provided by Ed Voves at Art Eyewitness.

May 16th, 2014

IAPT Conference on Photography and Theory 2014

Posted by Lucaites in conferences & shows

Occupy Wall Street Blog 3

The International Association of Photography and Theory announces the call for papers for its 2014 Conference,  which aims to critically investigate the relationship between photography and politics as well as the politics of the medium itself. The Conference will be held in Nicosia, Cyprus from December 5-7 and will feature keynote speakers Walid Raad and John Tagg.

Proposals for 30-minute presentations (20 minutes presentation and 10 minutes for discussion) are invited from various disciplines, including: photography, art history and theory, visual sociology, anthropology, museology, philosophy, ethnography, cultural studies, visual and media studies, communications, and fine and graphic arts. These should present an in-depth investigation of the relationship between photography and politics and the politics of the photographic practice historically, philosophically or through specific case studies.

To propose a paper please send a 400-word (excluding references) abstract no later than June 7, 2014 to icpt@photographyandtheory.com. For the purposes of blind refereeing, full name of each author with current affiliation and full contact details (address, email, phone), title of presentation, and a short biographical note (200 words) should be supplied on a separate document. Both documents (abstract and contact details) should be in English.

Credit: David’s Camera Craft

 

May 9th, 2014

IVSA Conference: Visual Dialogues in Postindustrial Societies

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

IVSA-2014Conference-PromoPic_ffab69a826441a2642c116635047bd3d

Visual Dialogues in Postindustrial Societies: Transforming the Gaze

The 2014 Annual Conference of the International Visual Sociology Association

June 26-28, 2014 at Duquesne University (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania).

Conference Theme: Post-industrial societies require new forms of visual imagination and research. In this context visual researchers create new ways of capturing and interpreting our constantly transforming social life, and construct alternative epistemologies that dialogue with increasingly broader audiences and disciplines.

The preliminary conference program and registration details are here.  The IVSA home page is here.

 

April 18th, 2014

Conference on the Visual Culture of the News

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Timby_Fig1_newsstand

Getting the Picture: The Visual Culture of the News

Visual Studies Research Institute/University of Southern California

May 4-5, 2014

 Few would dispute that the news picture, whether static or moving, photographic or autographic, is one of the most ubiquitous, powerful and controversial kinds of images today and that there is a long and complex history of the news picture still to be analyzed and explained. This two-day, interdisciplinary workshop — which includes scholars in fields ranging from art history and history to English, comparative literature, and communications — seeks to classify and comprehend those pictures that are news.

Papers will be pre-circulated for all participants to read. During the workshop, speakers will briefly summarize their papers before the floor opens up for group discussion. To participate and receive access to the papers, please RSVP to vsri@usc.edu.

The conference home page is here.  You can see the program here.

April 11th, 2014

West African Image Lab Workshop

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Franck Ogou and photographer Benoit Adjovi, Cotonou, Benin, c. Resolution 2013 small

Resolutionphoto.org has announced its forthcoming Préservation du patrimoine photographique africain (3PA): West African Image Lab, which will be held in Benin, April 22-25, 2014.

The workshop will provide technical training in preventive conservation as well as open a dialogue on preservation of mid-20th-century photography in collections in Africa. It is part of a larger initiative and series of projects emphasizing creative approaches to preservation, digitization, and digital dissemination, aimed at expanding public access to African photography.

The workshop will bring together museum and archive professionals, researchers, curators, photographers, and arts activists representing photography collections in both Anglophone and Francophone Africa.  Instructors and speakers include Fatima Fall, Centre de Recherches et de Documentation du Senegal (CRDS); Debra Hess Norris, University of Delaware Department of Art Conservation; Nora Kennedy, The Metropolitan Museum of Art; Bertrand Lavedrine, Centre de Recherche sur la Conservation des Collections, France; Franck Ogou and Fallo Baba Keita, Ecole du Patrimoine Africain, Benin.

Resolution is a non-profit organization dedicated to photography and photography collections in Africa.  They work to preserve important photography collections for future generations, and to expand public and community access to the African photographic heritage in the present.

For more information, contact Jennifer Bajorek, Resolution (NY) 917.697.6056, jennifer@resolutionphoto.org; Erin Haney, Resolution (DC), 202.841.3842, erin@resolutionphoto.org.

Photograph from Resolutionphoto.org of curator Franck Ogou and photographer Benoit Adjovi looking at Adjovi’s negative archives in Cotonou.

 

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