NO CAPTION NEEDED
ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHS, PUBLIC CULTURE, AND LIBERAL DEMOCRACY

No Caption Needed is a book and a blog, each dedicated to discussion of the role that photojournalism and other visual practices play in a vital democratic society. No caption needed, but many are provided. . . .

February 28th, 2014

Paper Call: Debating Visual Knowledge

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Screen shot 2014-02-27 at 4.25.33 PM

 “Debating Visual Knowledge” Graduate Symposium at the University of Pittsburgh
October 3 – 5, 2014

Call for Participants

Visual knowledge and visual literacy have become pressing concerns across a variety of academic disciplines and areas of creative production. These concerns are shaped by the fluid definitions of “visual knowledge” and the multiple ways in which it manifests. Many forms of visual knowledge have capabilities that are not shared by language. This knowledge is produced, mediated, and distributed by a number of different objects, tools, media, and technologies. This symposium seeks to broaden understandings of intellectual and creative work by interrogating the theorization, production, use, and historicization of visual knowledge. We envision the event as an exploratory lab, comprising scholarly and creative projects that engage with these questions.

Presentations might relate to (but are not limited to) topics such as:

● Digital humanities
● Cognition, intellectual history, interpretation
● Photography, printmaking, engraving
● “The spatial turn,” GIS, maps, mapping
● The body, performance
● Data visualizations, modeling, categories and groups
● Law and policy
● Media theory, historiography, ecology
● Exhibition design, curating
● Network analysis, grids, graphs, timelines
● Interfaces, constructed/built environments, design
● Astronomy, physics, mathematics, botany, medicine

The symposium will include traditional academic papers, posters, and keynote sessions, as well as presentations of creative works, roundtables, praxis sessions, screenings, and performances. Participants may be invited to take part in curated roundtables, seminars or workshops. We also welcome submissions of projects that could be workshopped or collaborated on in the context of the symposium.

Submission Guidelines:

● For a paper, please submit a 300-word abstract for a 20-minute talk, and a CV.
● For a poster, please submit a 300-word abstract and a CV.  A sketch of your poster is optional. If selected, posters must be printed and provided by the participants, and can be up to 30” x 40”.
● For a creative work, please submit up to 10 images and/or a 2-minute video or sound clip, a 300-word project description, and a CV.
● For a pre-constituted panel of up to four papers, please submit a 300-word abstract describing the panel topic, and a 150-word abstract and author’s CV for each proposed paper.
● To propose to lead a roundtable, seminar, or praxis session, please submit a 300-word description of the topic and CVs for all proposed participants.  You may also propose a topic without having chosen participants.

If you have any questions about possible submissions or formats for submissions, please contact us at debatingvisualknowledge@gmail.com.

Send submissions to debatingvisualknowledge@gmail.com by April 11, 2014. Selected participants will be notified by mid-May.

Photograph from London’s Fashion Week, 2014 by Suzanne Plunkett/Reuters.  The photo was not supplied by the conference organizers, but it does give new meaning to both “debating” and “visual knowledge.”

February 7th, 2014

Who’s Perfect, Anyway? Pro Infirmis Exposes the Power of Modeling

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Idealization suffuses visual media, and the damage includes everything from promoting impossible body images to making real people invisible.  But sometimes an artist can turn convention against itself, and the results can be amazing.

pro infirmis wheelchair

The Swiss organization Pro Infirmis has created an art project that includes a department store installation and this film.  Their website is here, and for those who can’t read German, French, or Italian, you can read more about the project here.

The film has been going viral–over 11 million views at YouTube, among others–and we’re happy to help it along.  There is much that could be said, and not only about issues of disability.  For readers of this blog, the work could provide a fascinating reconsideration of questions about modeling, the relationships between images and mannequins, and between mirrors, mannequins, photographs, and self-image, and about copying and self-consciousness, and much more as well.  But that will be left for another day.  For now, watch the film and ponder what is revealed.

January 24th, 2014

Life-Framer Contest and Exhibition

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

life-framer-photo-contest-photography-competition-13-1024x682

Life Framer is a non-profit driven photography competition designed to source and showcase outstanding photography from amateur, emerging, and established photographers.  Each month there is a competition on a theme, with the winners then collected for an annual exhibition.

The submission deadlines currently open are January 31st, on the theme Times of Your Life, and February 28, with an open call.  More information is available at their web site.

This year the annual exhibition will run from April 1-22 at theprintspace gallery in London.  There will be an additional show from April 19-May 3 at Juraplatz, Switzerland, an outdoor road-side art space.

Photograph, a runner-up in the 2013 open call competition, by Visarut Teerawatvichaikul.

January 16th, 2014

Exhibition: Prison Obscura

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Prison-Obscura-Cell-Illustration

Cantor Fitzgerald Gallery, Whitehead Campus Center, Haverford College, Haverford, PA

January 24 -March 7, 2014

Curated by Prison Photography editor Pete Brook, Prison Obscura presents rarely seen vernacular, surveillance, evidentiary, and prisoner-made photographs, shedding light on the prison industrial complex.  Why do tax-paying, prison-funding citizens rarely get the chance to see such images?  And what roles do these pictures play for those within the system?  With stark aesthetic detail and meticulous documentation, Prison Obscura builds the case that Americans must come face to face with these images and imaging technologies both to grasp the cancerous proliferation of the U.S. prison system and to connect with those it confines.

Additional Information is available here.

Prison Obscura illustration by Ellen Gould.

 

December 13th, 2013

Paper Call: The Visual Communication Conference

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

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Call for Papers and Panels – 2014

Deadline for proposals is February 28, 2014
Hosted by the University of Rhode Island & Roger Williams University
June 22-26, 2014
Whispering Pines, West Greenwich Rhode Island

The organizers of the 28th Annual Visual Communication Conference invite faculty and students to submit research and creative presentations from the varied and emergent field of visual communication. Topics may include, but are not limited to, graphic design, visual aesthetics, visual rhetoric, semiotics, still and motion photography, documentary and feature films, visual literacy, visual ethics, multimedia and new communication technologies, visual culture, and pedagogy in visual communication. While traditional research is welcome, authors and creators of all accepted submissions must present their work in a visual way.  In addition, video presentations of research will be considered creative work and reserved for the creative work sessions.

Additional information on the paper call is here.  The VisCom main page is here.

December 6th, 2013

Aperture Gallery Workshop on Photographic Collaboration

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Collaboration: Revisiting the History of Photography

Wendy_Ewald

Saturday, December 7
1:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Aperture Gallery and Bookstore
547 West 27th Street
New York, NY
FREE

Join Ariella Azoulay, Wendy Ewald, Susan Meiselas, and graduate students from Brown University and Rhode Island School of Design for an Open Lab at Aperture Gallery, as they develop the first draft of a research project that reconsiders the story of photography from the perspective of collaboration. The team will map out a timeline of approximately one hundred photography projects—in which photographers “co-labor” with each other and with those they photograph—on the walls of the Aperture Bookstore.

“The timeline includes close to one hundred projects assembled in eight different clusters. Each of these projects address a different aspect of collaboration: the intimate ‘face-to-face’ encounter between photographer and photographed person; collaborations recognized over time; collaboration as the production of alternative and common histories; as a means of creating new potentialities in given political regimes of violence; as a framework for collecting, preserving, and studying existing images as a basis for establishing civil archives for unrecognized, endangered, or oppressed communities; as a vantage point to reflect on relations of co-laboring that are hidden, denied, compelled, imagined, or fake.

“These clusters are taped to the walls as a large modular desktop, susceptible to multiple readings and changes. The different projects are ‘quoted’ through small reference prints in a laboratory mode, and juxtaposed on the wall with verbal quotations from the participants in the event of photography, as well as other archival documentation. This display format is a first draft that will be extended and modified following the discussions with the audience in the space.

“In this project we seek to reconstruct the material, practical, and political conditions of collaboration through photography and of photography through collaboration. We seek ways to foreground—and create—the tension between the collaborative process and the photographic product by reconstructing the participation of others, usually the more ‘silent’ participants. We try to do this through the presentation of a large repertoire of types of collaborations, those which take place at the moment when a photograph is taken, or others that are understood as collaboration only later, when a photograph is reproduced and disseminated, juxtaposed to another, read by others, investigated, explored, preserved, and accumulated in an archive to create a new database.”

This one-day event is a unique opportunity to engage with the project. All gallery visitors are invited to see the Open Lab in progress, and encouraged to contribute to the informal discussion about photography and collaboration.

The Saturday schedule and additional information is here.

Photograph by Wendy Ewald: Harshad, Hasmukh, Chandrakant, and Dasrath learning to hold the camera.

November 15th, 2013

Last Stop: War/Photography at the Brooklyn Museum

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Astrada-Congolese-Women_428H

WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY: Images of Armed Conflict and Its Aftermath is an exhibition of 400 photographs that was organized by the Houston Museum of Fine Arts and now has come to the Brooklyn Museum, where it will close on February 2, 2014.

The exhibition “explores the experience of war with an unprecedented collection of 400 photographic prints, books, magazines, albums, and camera equipment, bringing together iconic and unknown images taken by members of the military, commercial portraitists, journalists, amateurs, artists, and numerous Pulitzer Prize–winning photographers.

“Including the work of some 255 photographers from around the globe who have covered conflicts over the last 166 years, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY examines the interrelationship between war and photography, reveals the evolution of the medium by which war is recorded and remembered, and explores the range of experience of armed conflict: recruitment, training, embarkation, daily routine, battle, death and destruction, homecoming, and remembrance. In addition to depicting the phases of war, WAR/PHOTOGRAPHY includes portraits of servicemen, military and political leaders, and civilians and refugees.”

More information on the exhibition and the museum is available here.

Photograph by Walter Astrada. Congolese women fleeing to Goma, from the series Violence Against Women in Congo, Rape as Weapon of War in DRC, 2008.

 

October 25th, 2013

Fade To Black with BJP

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

fadefront

The British Journal of Photography has a new online quarterly magazine for the iPad called Fade to Black.  The magazine is “dedicated to a new generation of image-makers who embrace the convergence of photography, video and multimedia, and all the new opportunities offered by digital capture and distribution to shoot and distribute their projects themselves.”

A free six-month subscription is available here.

October 18th, 2013

Paper Call: The Visual Culture of the News

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

Getting the Picture: The Visual Culture of the News

LA Times riots

 The Visual Studies Research Institute at the University of Southern California invites submissions for a conference on Getting the Picture: The Visual Culture of the News, which will be held May 4-5, 2014.  The conference is part of a three year project on “Visual Evidence.”  The full paper call is here.

They invite submissions from junior scholars and graduate students in their final year working across all times and places on “news pictures.” Send a 250-word abstract and CV by November 1, 2013 to vsri@usc.edu; include “News Pictures” in the email title. Travel and expenses will be paid. Papers will be pre-circulated and commented upon and there is an expectation that participants will read the papers of other participants (between 10-12 papers). They will be due April 25, 2014.

October 11th, 2013

Exhibition on The Social: Encountering Photography

Posted by Hariman in conferences & shows

NEPN / Sunderland

The North East Photography Network is sponsoring The Social: Encountering Photography, which is a month-long series of photography exhibitions, installations, and talks in Sunderland and North East England, UK.  The program (OK, the programme) is listed here.

Photograph by Simon Roberts, Penshaw Monument, Penshaw, July 2013 from The Social: landscapes of leisure.

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