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ICONIC PHOTOGRAPHS, PUBLIC CULTURE, AND LIBERAL DEMOCRACY

No Caption Needed is a book and a blog, each dedicated to discussion of the role that photojournalism and other visual practices play in a vital democratic society. No caption needed, but many are provided. . . .

December 21st, 2012

God’s Ornaments

Posted by Hariman in no caption needed

snowflake1

Best wishes for a peaceful holiday.  We’ll return to our regular schedule on January 7.

Photograph by Kenneth G. Libbrecht, author of The Art of the Snowflake: A Photographic Album and SnowCrystals.com.

One Response to ' God’s Ornaments '

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  1. Anonymous said,

    on December 27th, 2012 at 9:48 pm

    “This is the poem of the air”

    After the recent snowstorm in the Midwest (12 inches at Indiana University), Longfellow’s “Snow-Flakes” seemed a poignant ‘reveal’ to a similar reading of the snow; perhaps God’s and those young ones who perished in Newton’s memorial for all of us who linger in the despair of the event that occurred.

    “Snow-Flakes”
    Audio Reading: http://sharesend.com/r8zmuudm

    Out of the bosom of the Air,
    Out of the cloud-folds of her garments shaken,
    Over the woodlands brown and bare,
    Over the harvest-fields forsaken,
    Silent, and soft, and slow
    Descends the snow.

    Even as our cloudy fancies take
    Suddenly shape in some divine expression,
    Even as the troubled heart doth make
    In the white countenance confession,
    The troubled sky reveals
    The grief it feels.

    This is the poem of the air,
    Slowly in silent syllables recorded;
    This is the secret of despair.
    Long in its cloudy bosom hoarded,
    Now whispered and revealed
    To wood and field.
    Both text and audio are in the public domain.

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